Her Times
By Pam Parker Erie Times-News staff blogger
Pam Parker's blog takes on everything from women's fun to momisms to lifestyles around Lake Erie and real estate. She'll take you down Memory Lane, up through sports and fun and off the grid. Get ready for laughs — it's more than just Pam. It's Pamdemonium.   Read more about this blog.
 Phone: 814-870-1821
Posts tagged ‘Mom’
Posted: April 20th, 2014

Easter Basket with Easter Eggs

Every Easter, my husband gets into the eggs — eggstra special egg banter, that is. Here are some of his faves used in sentences for your enjoyment.

We are eggcited to see family today.

My stepdaughter-in-law is eggspecting.

Cadbury creme eggs are not eggstravagant treats.

There is no such thing as eggstraneous chocolate.

I will need eggstreme eggcerise to burn off the eggcelent chocolate eggs I consume.

Some things eggsacerbate the pain in my knee.

A coconut egg is eggsactly what I want.

It’s eggsasperating when we don’t hear from some family members.

I need to eggsamine the peanut butter pies.

Eggstract those jelly beans from the bottom of the Easter baskets.

I was afraid we’d have to eggscavate to find the daffodils when it snowed last week.

If the sun shines, it will eggceed  eggspectations today.

Dinner will be eggsceptional. My sister makes lamb.

My brother eggsagerates how much work it is makes German Potato Salad, but since I made it this year, I can verify that it requires an eggstraordinary amount of  time.

We eggsemplify a modern family. We have six kids between us, two of my stepsons are married, and we have one grandchild. And one on the way.

When my husband reads this eggcerpt, he is going to eggsclaim that I eggscluded a lot of words, but I have to stop. I have eggshausted my list.

Happy Easter everyone!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one. 

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: April 19th, 2014
Cadbury

Part of what was in the Easter care package I sent my son in Virginia. Can you tell what he likes for Easter? Kind of looks like a house, doesn’t it?

Cadbury egg cookies

Cadbury mini-egg cookies

I know you’re thinking what do Cadbury eggs and houses have in common? Well at our house, they go together quite well, and apparently in Canada also. Here’s a link to a Huffington Post story that discusses Cadbury eggs are among the top 15 things we want to eat on Easter Sunday. If you don’t  want the candy — you can make cookies — with mini Cadbury Eggs – here’s the recipe. 

Last year,  I introduced a lot of folks to Cadbury eggs and the fact that my kids have loved these gooey morsels ever since they were tots. Click here for last year’s blog.

Happy Saturday, and Saturdays in this blogger’s world mean houses. I have been to countless open houses in past weeks, and I discovered a lot of condos for sale in one block of homes. Read my column in today’s House to Home. It’s Georgian Court condos abound.

Also in this week’s House to Home:

»  Easter cactus blooms – Easter cactus delivers vibrant color
» Control weeds naturally – How to use natural substances on your lawn
» Add edibles to your garden – fruit and veggies not that hard to grow
» Container gardens grow color - Popular container gardens are easy to grow anywhere
» Spring clean with easy-to-use websites – How to sell your junk with apps and websites
» Rock around the basement – a basement redo to love
» What homes will look like and include in the future.
It is Easter weekend, and we don’t have open houses, but we do have a lot of new listings and new prices. And, here’s the flipbook — you can page through House to Home on your tablet while you’re cooking — I am boiling eggs right now. Or if you are eating Cadbury eggs.
Have a wonderful Easter!

Pam Parker has written about real estate and home decor in the tri-state region for more than 20 years. She is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one.  

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: April 16th, 2014

graduation capI think we have just completed our last FAFSA (free application for federal student aid) — after six kids and 10 years. Pop the champagne cork!

I know families who are just beginning this process. Bless you, and before you start evaluating where your student will attend school or start a career, remember — not everyone should go to college. Not everyone is cut out for college. And kids can get great training for careers at career schools in a much shorter term. Here’s my take on teens and careers:

1.You know your child. Encourage, but don’t take over in decision making. Your teen has to figure it all out. Help, but remind yourself that next year the regimented school days will be over. Your teen has to figure out what and where they will be all day, every day for the next year and the year after that and then some. No one can predict the future, but you and your teen have to have a plan.

2It’s difficult to determine a career path at age 18. Kids don’t all learn to tie their shoes at a magic age. Career decisions are no different. Some kids just know what they want before they earn a high school diploma, but others change their minds. More than once — possibly for years.  You have to let them do it and support them.  When they change their minds — on schools, careers, jobs, classes — make them do the legwork. Don’t. Do. It. For. Them. Just don’t. Been there, done that with six kids. All but one kid changed career plans at least once. Let them do the research and move forward. Examples: Three changed majors, and one wanted to change schools. We told them all to go see advisers and find out what they would lose and what they would gain. And what it would cost. Success in all cases.

3. If you have an athlete looking at sports scholarships — be careful. Your teen needs to spend the next four years or more training for a career — not just advancing his or her high school sports career — unless they can turn it into a career. Most parents and kids make good choices — a school that matches career needs — not just athletic ability. But some folks lose sight of the career when the carrot of  reduced debt for four years is dangled as a huge benefit. And sometimes it’s not as huge as you might think. Make sure your teen is ready for the pressure of college and athletics — they’re not in high school anymore. Not all kids can handle it. There are wonderful success stories out there, but if your student signs up for an intense 5- or 6-year degree that will require year-round schooling, remember what the college goal is: a career.

4. College tuition, fees and room and board cost thousands of dollars per year. The lowest tuition might be under $10,000 per year, and if your teen lives at home, he or she might get out with $40,000 in debt in four years, but that’s not the norm. It’s usually more. And that’s just the tuition. College is serious business and serious debt. Many kids benefit from waiting a year to attend school or finding other careers that require career schools  – a much cheaper option than a 2-year or 4-year degree. Don’t think that college is a rite of passage and just let your teen sign up and see what happens. Be smart — have goals.

If you are stressing about your teen’s future, stop. Kids are amazing at figuring out things on their own with a little help from parents, teachers and others. Everyone needs guidance, but don’t go crazy with control. Enjoy watching your son or daughter become an adult. None of it is easy, but it’s so rewarding — especially when they’re working in careers they love. Sigh. We are almost there with all six. Your kids will do it, too. Just be patient.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one.  All six kids attended post-secondary education. 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: April 15th, 2014

SharktankIf you need an idea on how to make a presentation, you can learn it all in an episode of Shark Tank.  Big tip: Know your numbers and your competition. And know the questions — it’s always the same. In essence, be prepared — tell the kids.

In a Forbes interview, one of the best deals Barbara Corcoran says she made  on Shark Tank was Daisy Cakes out of Pauline, S.C. Here’s a link to the Forbes article.

I watched that episode, and what was impressive was that Kim Adams Nelson, now 51, and owner of Daisy Cakes since 2009, truly had a homemade family operation. It’s now a very successful business. Even more impressive is that the company tried to use a commercial kitchen to prepare its cakes after her appearance on Shark Tank. The quality suffered, and the entire operation moved right back home to Pauline, S.C.  Read a 2013 interview with Nelson on Huffington Post here.

Another of Cororoan’s huge successes that I loved was Ava the elephant, a talking medicine dispenser. Inventor Tiffany Krumins, a cancer survivor, went on to develop thermometer stickers. Krumins was voted among the top 50 Mompreneurs of 2011 by Babble.com. She has been featured on Entreprenuer.com along with Bank of America and many other sites. The product is now in thousands of stores throughout the country.

Even the entrepreneurs who failed often end up as successes because of the exposure they receive on Shark Tank. Great ideas abound out there, and you’ll see some of them on Shark Tank.  To read the most recent article on Shark Tank, visit Parade.com.

Pam Parker has written about real estate and home decor in the tri-state region for more than 20 years. She is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one.  

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: April 11th, 2014

470xauto-825367232-TR9IIuatd470xauto-824437305-TNfNTsvmrHere’s a contest to love — it features 25 real women of all shapes and sizes showing off their personal fashion statements. JCPenney sponsored it in Redbook Magazine. Check it out here.

The magazine invites us all to vote through May 12 for a favorite.

The winner gets a $500 shopping spree and a feature in the September issue of Redbook.

Here are just a few of my favorites. Seems I’m liking pink and black — but the 25 finalists wear it all. And many of them live in snow country based on the pictures. I just couldn’t bring myself to post anything with snow in it! Check it out on Twitter at @RedBookMag  and #RBKBestDressed.

Happy Friday!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one. 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: April 3rd, 2014

beerIt’s a great weekend for sap and tap lovers.

The Asbury Woods Maple festival is this weekend — read about it here. Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m, you can enjoy pancakes and real maple syrup at a Millcreek treasure — Asbury Woods. On Monday, it’s time to celebrate the anniversary of Prohibition’s end on April 7, 1933 — #NationalBeerDay.

The hoppy holiday makes the night before New Beer’s Eve — lots of fun on Twitter and Facebook.

Where did National Beer Day come from? Prohibition.  On April 7th, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Cullen-Harrison Act. It ended the 13 years of alcohol prohibition in the United States. Clever folks made beer the night before to celebrate. Even if you don’t like beer, you can celebrate with a shandy, or shandygaff – beer mixed with soda, lemonade, ginger ale or even cider. Wikipedia says a shandy with beer and cider is called a snakebite.

Cheers!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one. 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: March 20th, 2014

Wedding ringThe first day of spring sets up a few Vernal Equinox holidays including National Proposal Day. Most romantic local proposals I’ve heard of:

Moonlit sleigh rides (or horse and buggy) — we had a story on it a few years ago in Lake Erie LifeStyle. We also heard of some special dinner proposals and proposals that take couples back to the first place they met — even on grade school play grounds. Here are a dozen romantic proposals from Your Tango.com

According to Huffington Post, the day originated with John Michael O’Laughlin of Irving, Texas.
Huffington Post also shared reader engagement stories in 2013. Read them here.

Here are “10 proposal videos that will make you cry” from Bridalguide.com.

ProposalDay.com suggests that the Most Eligible Bachelor in the world is Prince Harry followed by Leonardo DiCaprio.On the ladies side it’s Taylor Swift followed by Emma Watson. Read the entire article here.

Spring has sprung — it’s a great day to pop the question. And if you are thinking about it, act fast. The American Gem Society launched the Perfect Proposal Toolkit and a great contest. Today is the final day to enter to win a $2,500 gift certificate from the 1,700 participating AGS certified jewelers in the United States. Thank to Jasen Woehrle for the news!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: March 18th, 2014

chocolate chipsFinally, a study I won’t make fun of.

Yesterday, the Associated Press reported that pills with all those good nutrients in dark chocolate might have the ability to prevent heart attacks and strokes.

The four-year study has 18,000 participants — why oh why didn’t they call me?

This is no joke. The study quoted Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Who are the sponsors – you guessed it – chocolate manufacturers — Mars Inc., famous for M&M’s and Snickers — and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Why Mars? It patented extraction of cocoa flavanols and converts them into capsules.

The study will also analyze multivitamins — no chocolate in there. To read the full Associated Press report on NPR, click here.

More healthy stories from NPR — a fascinating story on how doctors in Ann Arbor used a 3-D printer to replicate a baby’s windpipe and save his life. Read it here. More health stories: Do iPads help or harm your toddlers? and look out for the Mumps Outbreak at Ohio State University. Theres a big drop in colon cancer — 30 percent in people 50 and older — read about it here.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: March 17th, 2014

Christmas Present Wrapped in Gold and Silver 2000After the wearing o’ the green is over, National Single Parent Day sneaks up on us on March 21, according to  of Yahoo.comShe explained the origin of the holiday last year with some surprising stats — here’s a portion of her article:

13.6 million single parents in the U.S. who are responsible for 21.2 million children. Households headed by single fathers is the fastest growing segment, having increased in numbers by 60 percent in the decade between 2000 to 2010.
In 1984 President Ronald Reagan proclaimed March 21 to be “National Single Parent Day. … In the United States, about 35 percent of all children live in single-parent households. The fewest percentage lives in Utah with only 21 percent, and the highest percentage lives in the District of Columbia with 64 percent.”

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: March 16th, 2014
Kelly and Paul

Paul Fries at John Fries Auto Sales hands over the keys to Kelly Eckert.

Kim & Kell

Kelly and stepdaddy Kim Parker stand by her new ride in the Parker driveway.

The urge to get a new car strikes every spring. Last year my daughter, Kelly, who lives in Pittsburgh, paid off her old Chevy Cobalt and thought about a newer car but found nothing appealing. This year, the old Cobalt was begging to be replaced.
She shopped online looking at cars at John Fries Auto Sales, returned home for a one-day, drive-it and buy it extravaganza and was back in Pittsburgh that evening. My hubby, Kim, checked them out for her in advance.

I remember the old days — when we hit a dozen car lots for some of the kids’ car purchases. This was a real switch.

It was also a reminder that we have purchased 10 cars from Paul Fries. And we (the entire Eckert and Parker clans) have purchased way more than that as a group in the past 11 years. That boggles my mind.

I also learned the urban lingo on what you call a new car. It’s not just a new ride, or a red Escape. It’s a “whip,” Kelly told me.

I looked it up on The Urban Dictionary, and here’s how they came up with that.

“When the steering wheel was first put into use in automobiles, it was called the “whip.” The whip is what you used to control the horses on a stagecoach, hence the analogy. Many years later, various hip hop artists noticed that the Mercedes-Benz logo resembled a steering wheel. They then proceeded to use the old term “whip” to describe any Mercedes-Benz vehicle. The term has now been generalized to classify any expensive automobile.”

The funny thing is I owned a similar Ford Escape a few years ago. So it was like going home in a way with my little girl in a new ride. Although it was a quick day — we even had time for a shopping spree through Walmart, a fish sandwich lunch at McGarrey’s, and she found a raincoat I was going to return to 6pm.com fit her perfectly. No need for a return!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized

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