Her Times
By Pam Parker Erie Times-News staff blogger
Pam Parker's blog takes on everything from women's fun to momisms to lifestyles around Lake Erie and real estate. She'll take you down Memory Lane, up through sports and fun and off the grid. Get ready for laughs — it's more than just Pam. It's Pamdemonium.   Read more about this blog.
 Phone: 814-870-1821
Posts tagged ‘NPR’
Posted: March 18th, 2014

chocolate chipsFinally, a study I won’t make fun of.

Yesterday, the Associated Press reported that pills with all those good nutrients in dark chocolate might have the ability to prevent heart attacks and strokes.

The four-year study has 18,000 participants — why oh why didn’t they call me?

This is no joke. The study quoted Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Who are the sponsors – you guessed it – chocolate manufacturers — Mars Inc., famous for M&M’s and Snickers — and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Why Mars? It patented extraction of cocoa flavanols and converts them into capsules.

The study will also analyze multivitamins — no chocolate in there. To read the full Associated Press report on NPR, click here.

More healthy stories from NPR — a fascinating story on how doctors in Ann Arbor used a 3-D printer to replicate a baby’s windpipe and save his life. Read it here. More health stories: Do iPads help or harm your toddlers? and look out for the Mumps Outbreak at Ohio State University. Theres a big drop in colon cancer — 30 percent in people 50 and older — read about it here.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: March 10th, 2014

dali-clockThe minute we turn those clocks back, I lose my early morning productivity. I’m one of those people who almost always awakens before the alarm — at around 5 a.m. Now, it’s 6. I’m not the only one.

Yesterday seemed to whiz by, and I feel like I lost a day not an hour. Here are some funny takes on Daylight Savings Time other folks have found:

From Gothamist: 22 reasons why Daylight savings should be abolished – click on that link and you’ll get all 22 reasons, but I really like that Gothamist said the idea started in 1784 — as a joke — thanks to Benjamin Franklin.

Others agree. In his blog, Bill Chappell of NPR quotes the Department of Energy: ”Sometimes credited with inventing Daylight Saving Time, Benjamin Franklin — the man who is known for the saying “Early to bed and early to rise …” — did not actually suggest a change in time. Franklin’s connection to Daylight Saving Time comes from his 1784 satirical letter to the editor in the Journal de Paris in which he proposed that Parisians could save money on candles by waking up before their normal time of noon.”

We bet Benjamin Franklin is still laughing. Gothamist and other columnists note that traffic accidents and heart attacks increase. Now that’s scary, and a lot of sites verify that it’s true up to three days after the actual change. So be careful out there.

Happy Monday. We’ll all get used to this. Bring on the daylight.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

 

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: January 23rd, 2014

ColemanIf you watch any video with Seattle Seahawks fullback Derrick Coleman, you’ll be inspired.

He is the first deaf offensive player to ever play in the NFL. USA Today reported that Duracell released a commercial about his story. It made me cry. Deaf since age 3, Coleman beat some tough odds to wear hearing aids in a rough game. Here’s a link to the USA story that also includes a letter Coleman responded to from a young deaf student.

Another Super Bowl story centers on Denver Broncos‘ quarterback Peyton Manning’s use of the word “Omaha” in play calling. The folks in Omaha are ecstatic, and everyone is playing the gig for all it’s worth. This NPR interview has NPR’ Melissa Block and David Brown, president and CEO of the Omaha Chamber of Commerce, sharing some fun news about how Omaha has benefited from the play calling.

The report shares that Omaha donates $800 to Peyton Manning’s charity every time he said “Omaha” this season — to the tune of $25,000. It’s safe to say there are a lot of Bronco fans in Omaha. And the city returned the favor. When chicks were born at the zoo, one was named Peyton. The city also made a video — click here to see it.

The back stories to Super Bowl – which takes place in New Jersey on Feb. 2 — are great fun. One forecast that will highlight the event is cold temperatures and snow — something all of us in Erie, Pa., can understand.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: December 21st, 2013

Front Door

Millennials — those kids born between 1980 and 2000 — have flocked to California in a new tech boom reminiscent of the old tech boom.

Finding affordable living quarters is still a problem. NPR shared a story on a dozen young professionals who have created their own community of sorts. You can read and/or listen to the story here

The NPR story references that the San Francisco Chronicle reports that mansions are finding new life with group living where friends and acquaintances room together in one home — a much more affordable option to renting an apartment or buying a home in California’s expensive real estate market.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: November 21st, 2013

Doctor Checking the Blood Pressure of a PatientNPR reported yesterday that 78 million people in the United States have high blood pressure. That’s an incredible number of people with potential health risks. The really bad news is that half of them do not have their blood pressure under control. But there’s hope.

Dr. Alan Go of Kaiser Permanente, a health care insurer, led a program that started in 2001 in California. At the beginning, only 44 percent of patients had their blood pressure under control. By 2011, 87 percent controlled their blood pressure. It started with getting rid of copays for doctor visits to control high blood pressure because — well let’s face it– to get this problem under control takes more than a few visits to the doc. If you return five times for the same problem, you’ve coughed up about $150 — just in copays. That will raise the BP.

The Million Hearts campaign is trying to help all of us lower blood pressure. It encourages folks to sign up online and become part of the campaign that pledges to get 65 percent of folks to control their blood pressure by 2017. Currently, about 46 percent are controlling blood pressure. Read the NPR story here.   Check some of the goals here.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: September 4th, 2013

helium ballooonsIt’s one of those stories you think is just full of hot air.

I couldn’t help myself. For years, (since 2006) National Public Radio has followed the story about diminishing helium. A few weeks ago an NPR interview with Sam Burton, the assistant manager for the Amarillo field office of the bureau of land management, where there is a helium reserve, opened my eyes on what the heck is going on with helium.

Listen to/read the full interview here. NPR’s Meghna Charkabarti and Jeremy Hobson learned from Burton that the National Helium Reserve could be shut down in October — part of an agreement that dates back to the 1990s. Helium is derived from natural gas, and it has some serious uses in computer chips, fiber optics and MRIs.

Helium is produced at gas refinement locations throughout the world, but some of those facilities are located in volatile areas. So helium is an important gas for technology … and balloons.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom of three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: April 18th, 2013

Young businessman standing over a young businesswoman sleeping on a couchIn a word: Kids? USA Today, National Public Radio and other venues have brought up a Center for Disease Control Study that 10 percent of men  and 15 percent of women aged 18-44 are exhausted. Here’s the USA Today article.

Most of the articles about the study attribute the fatigue to child-rearing. I think it’s interesting that the CDC put out the graph below that NPR used,Tired women

I don’t see anything in that graph except that women are permanently more tired than men.

The comments on Scott Hensley’s article on the NPR page “Annals Of The Obvious: Women Way More Tired Than Men” are worth reading.

Draw your own conclusions. I think it’s time for a nap.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three and stepmom to three. 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: March 25th, 2013

XceleratorI am officially conditioned to wave my hands in front of any hand dryer in a public restroom to make it work. Some will release paper and others will blow hot air. Here’s a story that’s better than hot air.

An NPR segment discussed the Xlerator hand dryer. It dries hands in 10 – 20 seconds, it’s made in the USA, and you don’t even have to wave at it. I met Xlerator at Primanti Brothers in Grove City. It works.

In February, National Public Radio featured a two-part series on its manufacturer — Excel Dryer, of East Longmeadow, Mass. For 31 years, the company has made hand dryers. Denis Gagnon bought the company in the 1990s, and revolutionized hand drying with the Xlerator hand dryers. NPR’s “How One Company Reinvented the Hand Dryer,” tells a fascinating story of how Gagnon met with scientists and invented an energy-efficient machine that campaigns with “It’s time to throw in the towel.”

The second part of the story is here.

Coca_ColaThe basic model of the Xlerator costs $400, and no one has to install clean towels or trash the used ones. No waving either. And you can customize a cover for almost anywhere. I’m thinking the Chez Parker bathroom could use one of these. xlerator1

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: February 22nd, 2013

CaptureWe’ve had flash mobs, macarenas and hey let’s do the twist. The Harlem Shake is the latest in a series of dances that’s gone viral. The video clip above is an admirable underwater presentation by the University of Georgia  swim and dive team.

Wikipedia says the Harlem Shake dates back to 1981 in Harlem. Here’s the listing on Wikipedia:

Here’s the NPR report – a great listen. 

But not everyone has a sense of humor.  Students in Brownsville,Pa., were suspended when they danced  it up over this viral craze. Read that story here.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: February 8th, 2013

NPR fashionThey’re back — prints, Bohemian style and more. Those of use who lived through the hippie days think some of the prints look a little familiar (and bizarre). Graphic, colorful and reminiscent of “Laugh In,” they all look like fun. 

In an NPR report, BCBG’s Max and Lubov Azria appeared at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week with “a nomadic, bohemian vibe.”

Read the full NPR story here. It indicates the clothes have a lot to do with gypsy inspirations. ”It sounds a little crazy, but it’s also a little bit hippie …” Max Azria said in the story by Samantha Critchell.

Looks like beanies and hoods are hot too.

Here’s a story in Glamour on Richard Nicoll’s new orange and pink print dress with a tablecloth hem. I swear I had a very similar style — always loved the pink and orange blend.

At bottom is Anja Rubik fresh from a page of Vogue. Yes, she is wearing a diamond pattern mixed with stripes and flowers. Read the full story here. It’s all groovy.

anja_rubik_en_balmain_2148_north_627xPam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one.

 

Posted in: Uncategorized

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