Her Times
By Pam Parker Erie Times-News staff blogger
Pam Parker's blog takes on everything from women's fun to momisms to lifestyles around Lake Erie and real estate. She'll take you down Memory Lane, up through sports and fun and off the grid. Get ready for laughs — it's more than just Pam. It's Pamdemonium.   Read more about this blog.
 Phone: 814-870-1821
Posts tagged ‘UPMC Hamot’
Posted: February 10th, 2014

heart[1]Thanks to everyone who e-mailed, called and messaged us after the last Her Times issue. What we learned:

A reader from Corry told us she never had any symptoms of heart disease but attended a free screening for cholesterol and blood pressure. The cholesterol test led to more tests, and months later she had a stent inserted in one of her arteries. “I’m one of those people you wrote about,” she said. “I might never have known anything was wrong if I hadn’t had that free screening. I encourage everyone to get a checkup. It could save your life.”

Decaf days In my efforts to decaffeinate my life — well reduce caffeine — I discovered this article on Kids and caffeine. I am still succeeding with one cup of mudlike (strong — very strong — Peet’s works for me) caffeinated coffee per day and additional mudlike decaf coffees. I rarely drink tea anymore — just water — tea didn’t help me at all.

To read about more local women who battled heart disease and won, click here.  We also had plenty of comments from women who loved hearing about spot reduction and blasting fat cells at Integrative MedSpa in Erie. Thanks for sharing!

Here are a couple of heart-healthy events coming up in the next few weeks:
“Exercise Your Heart Out”
Feb. 12, 5:30 p.m.
McGarvey Learning Center at Saint Vincent Hospital
Saint Vincent Wellness Coordinator Jennifer Territo will provide information on a variety of different exercises to incorporate into your daily routine to keep your heart healthy including Zumba, strength training and R.I.P.P.E.D.
Free
Reservations required: 452-5708.

“Your Legs Can Tell A Lot About Your Heart”
Feb. 20, 5:30 p.m.

McGarvey Learning Center at Saint Vincent Hospital
Saint Vincent Peripheral Vascular Surgeon Jay Kiessling, M.D., and Cardiologist Nishant Koradia, M.D., will talk about peripheral vascular disease symptoms, screening and treatment, as well as the connection between PVD and heart disease. Free varicose vein screenings available.
Free
Reservations required: 452-7273.

“Mr. and Mrs. Heart Disease”
Feb. 20, 6 p.m.

UPMC Hamot for Women Lecture Series with Audrey Swonger, C.R.N.P., cardiac nurse practitioner with Medicor Associates Inc. Swonger will discuss heart disease risk factors and symptoms unique to both men and women.
Lincoln Education Center at the UPMC Hamot Women’s Hospital
Free
Registration is required at least one week prior: https://classes.upmc.com/Consumer/Default.aspxFeb. 20, 6 p.m.
Lincoln Education Center at the UPMC Hamot Women’s Hospital
Free
Registration is required at least one week prior: https://classes.upmc.com/Consumer/Default.aspx

“Eat Your Heart Out!”
McGarvey Learning Center at Saint Vincent Hospital
Feb. 28, Noon
Saint Vincent Wellness Dietitian Leslie Lawton, R.D., will present a seminar on a variety of foods to keep your heart healthy. Also includes a cooking demonstration.
Free
Reservations required: 452-5708.

Here’s a link to an article on Kids and caffeine.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: February 3rd, 2014

WearRed250.113155 (1)If you checked out Her Times yesterday, you know that February is the month women need to check out matters of the heart — and that means more than romance. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in Erie County. Here are some events to check out — just a few hours of your time:

Friday is the 8th Annual Wear Red Heart Awareness Expo
Put on your red dress and head down to the Sheraton Bayfront Hotel on Friday, Feb. 7 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The day’s activities include five, half-hour mini lectures, free health screenings, healthy food sampling, shopping, and a raffle.

View the Wear Red Day flier to learn more about the lectures, health screenings, and other details. You can get free screenings — blood pressure, body mass index, cardiovascular risk assessment, varicose vein, diabetes  and stroke risk – and $10 cholesterol and blood sugar testing. For more information, see the schedule of events here.

More events this month include:

“Exercise Your Heart Out”
Feb. 12, 5:30 p.m.
McGarvey Learning Center at Saint Vincent Hospital
Saint Vincent Wellness Coordinator Jennifer Territo will provide information on a variety of different exercises to incorporate into your daily routine to keep your heart healthy including Zumba, strength training and R.I.P.P.E.D.
Free
Reservations required: 452-5708.

“Your Legs Can Tell A Lot About Your Heart”
Feb. 20, 5:30 p.m.
McGarvey Learning Center at Saint Vincent Hospital
Saint Vincent Peripheral Vascular Surgeon Jay Kiessling, M.D., and Cardiologist Nishant Koradia, M.D., will talk about peripheral vascular disease symptoms, screening and treatment, as well as the connection between PVD and heart disease. Free varicose vein screenings available.
Free
Reservations required: 452-7273.

“Mr. and Mrs. Heart Disease”
Feb. 20, 6 p.m.
UPMC Hamot for Women Lecture Series with Audrey Swonger, C.R.N.P., cardiac nurse practitioner with Medicor Associates Inc. Swonger will discuss heart disease risk factors and symptoms unique to both men and women.
Lincoln Education Center at the UPMC Hamot Women’s Hospital
Free
Registration is required at least one week prior: https://classes.upmc.com/Consumer/Default.aspx

“Eat Your Heart Out!”
McGarvey Learning Center at Saint Vincent Hospital
Feb. 28, Noon
Saint Vincent Wellness Dietitian Leslie Lawton, R.D., will present a seminar on a variety of foods to keep your heart healthy. Also includes a cooking demonstration.
Free
Reservations required: 452-5708.

Signs of a heart attack in women are often different than men, according to the American Heart Association. Sweating, pressure, nausea and jaw pain could be signs — in addition to pressure in the chest, pain or discomfort in one or both arms, shortness of breath and lightheadedness. Don’t ignore pain in the back, neck or stomach.

Signs of a stroke from American Heart Association include: numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, confusion, trouble speaking or understanding, blurred vision in one or both eyes. dizziness, loss of balance or coordination, or sudden severe headache.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandPam to one.

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: October 29th, 2013

red dress 2It’s Tuesday, Red Shoe Day and World Stroke Day. I’ll tie them together. Just give me a minute. A lot of people in my family and circle of friends have been affected by strokes. My grandfather, father, niece (and she was only 30) and many others close to me — young people — have had strokes.

Know the signs, and don’t ignore them. During a stroke, blood doesn’t flow properly in the brain, so stroke victims may not realize that something is wrong. It’s up to the rest of us. Here are signs to never ignore if they come on suddenly:

Severe headache. My niece, mom of a newborn at the time, had a headache — not just any headache. Her husband took her to the ER, and she had a stroke in the ER. She recovered within months, but a headache isn’t always just a headache.

Numbness. In my dad’s case, it was numbness of his fingers. He didn’t recognize it as a symptom. We caught it because he didn’t sound right when I called him, and a neighbor checked on him for me. The neighbor called 911, and my dad was very lucky. No permanent damage, but he spent six months relearning a lot of common tasks.  A friend of mine also passed off numbness as nothing wrong until her family insisted they all go to the ER where they learned she had a stroke.

Arm weakness. Don’t pass it off as a cramp or too much exercise if it comes on suddenly.

Difficulty speaking or thinking can be a sign of stroke. Slurring words, confusion or an inability to understand or comply with simple commands can be a sign that something is wrong.

Local hospitals are on the case

Clot-buster medications can help many stroke victims. Click here to read stroke survival stories from UPMC Hamot. Visit the Saint Vincent Stroke Center for more information on its stories and technology.

The American Heart Association has more information. And women should visit Goredforwomen.org to learn more about how heart disease affects women. It still kills more women than all cancers combined.

Get out the red shoes every Tuesday

Wearing red shoes on Tuesday is part of a movement of women supporting women for career success. Mariela Dabbah started the Red Shoe Movement to support Latino women. Red Shoe Tuesdays shouts out our support for women moving into management careers. Men often wear red ties or red socks as support. Even Richard Royce (Kevin Bishop) from Rebel Wilson‘s sitcom “Super Fun Night” wears a red tie.

Stay healthy, everyone!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is mom to three, stepmom to three and GramPam to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: February 1st, 2013

boot2viewsRemember, today is Wear Red Day — the American Heart Association reminds women to get checked for heart disease. UPMC Hamot has a full slate of events — click here. At Goredforwomen.org, learn more. images

And, here’s a thought to protect that pedicure! According to the website, Bootie Pies are cozy boots with a collapsible front flap that exposes the toes while getting a pedicure. Bootie Pies look like fashionable UGGs and are made from high quality suede and leather s like coconut crème, chocolate and blackberry. www.bootiepies.com. The shorter boots (more like shoes) are $68, and the taller boots (at left) are about $88. Wear them with your gloves that flip down for a manicure and make a statement!

Back to our hearts — heart disease kills more women 25 and older than all cancers combined. Signs of a heart attack in women are often different than men, according to the American Heart Association. Sweating, pressure, nausea and jaw pain could be signs in addition to pressure in the chest, pain or discomfort in one or both arms, shortness of breath and lightheadedness. Don’t ignore pain in the back, neck or stomach.

Signs of a stroke from American Heart Association include: numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, confusion, trouble speaking or understanding, blurred vision in one or both eyes, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination, or sudden severe headache.Take care, and get a checkup!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one.  

faq

 

 

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: January 17th, 2013

Mary ScutellaMary Scutella and her husband, Pat, caretakers of the lighthouse on Lighthouse Street in Erie had quite a scare in November. Mary survived an aortic dissection, the same heart condition that killed “Three’s Company” actor John Ritter at age 54 while he was at work in 2003 on ”8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter.”

The condition can kill within 72 hours of diagnosis. UPMC Hamot surgeon Michael Butler, M.D., and cardiologist Charles Furr, M.D., saved Mary’s life. Read David Bruce’s full story here.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one. 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: January 11th, 2013

WearRed250.113155
Plan now for your Feb. 1 wardrobe. It’s Wear Red Day — a day that promotes awareness of heart disease in men and women. The first Friday in February, established as Wear Red Day in 2003, added a special focus on women because heart disease still kills more women every year than all cancers combined.

In Erie, thanks to UPMC Hamot for the reminder to wear red. Check right here for all the events at UPMC Hamot for Feb. 1. From 9:30 to 2, you can get free screenings and $10 cholesterol and blood sugar testing. For more information, see the schedule of events here.

At Goredforwomen.org, you can learn more. For example, signs of a heart attack in women are often different than men, according to the American Heart Association. Sweating, pressure, nausea and jaw pain could be signs in addition to pressure in the chest, pain or discomfort in one or both arms, shortness of breath and lightheadedness. Don’t ignore pain in the back, neck or stomach.

Signs of a stroke from American Heart Association include: numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, confusion, trouble speaking or understanding, blurred vision in one or both eyes. dizziness, loss of balance or coordination, or sudden severe headache.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grand

images

mom to one.

 

 

 

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: September 15th, 2012
Perry Square is getting spiffed up thanks to the Perry Square Alliance, a nonprofit group formed in 2008. The fountain, the lights and more — our central city park is getting a makeover. Read the story here. The group will hold a fundraising event, Party off the Park, at Erie Insurance on Friday.

Gloria Knox, president of the alliance, said the park has a lot of history. The fountain, originally built in 1929 to commemorate the anniversary of Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb, is one of the many items on the docket for restoration. The fundraising event will also honor many of the people involved in the park’s restoration, including Bertrand Artigues, Tracey Diefenbach, Gary Diley, Tippy Dworzanski, the Rev. John P. Downey, Jerry Fagley, Barbara Macks, James E. Martin, James W. Martin, Colm McWilliams, Ray Moluski, Fr. Steve Simon, Jennifer Snow and Linda Wagner.

The event will honor four sponsors for the four outside corners of the park that include Stairways Behavioral Health board members, Gannon University, Kiwanis of Erie and PNC Bank.The host committee includes Paul and Tracey Diefenbach, Erie Beer, Kidder Wachter Architecture & Design, Kimkopy Printing, Knox, McLaughlin, Gornall & Sennett PC, Wally and Gloria Knox, Northwest Savings Bank, UPMC Hamot, Sherlocks/Park Place and Sunburst Electronics.

Tickets to the event planned from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Erie Insurance Atrium with cocktails, hours d’oevres and music. Tickets are $75 per person. For more information, contact Gloria Knox at 456-1888 or Glomom55@aol.com.

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa.

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: November 30th, 2011

It was a long night. A knock on the bedroom door at 2:20 a.m. announced that my youngest son, Ryan, 19, had a dislocated shoulder.

He’s had this before. Many times. But shoulder surgery four years ago all but eliminated the dislocations. We headed to the UPMC Hamot ER where docs all but instantly put his shoulder back in place … after the shot of fast-acting painkiller that relaxed Ryan enough for Jonathan Miller, M.D. to manipulate his shoulder back into place.

With the memory fresh in my mind (and a lack of sleep), I am cringing as I write this.

After Ryan was upright, that cute little devil asked how much the ER visit cost, and said that we didn’t have to buy him a Christmas present. Oh, Ryan, don’t make me cry.  We have bonded over a lot of injuries:  Head wounds and stitches, a hernia, a broken ankle that resulted in several visits to the ER — including getting the cast sawed off and replaced. A broken thumb, numerous illnesses and toenail removals followed. And then there were the surgeries, but let’s just stop right there.

During the visits, regardless of pain, Ryan is a champ. And we have chats about just about everything under the sun. In fact, that happens with my older son and daughter too.  Like most parents of athletes, I have been on a lot of emergency visits to docs, docs in the box and dentists.

In spite of a stressful situation, we usually find something to laugh about, and this time was no different. Usually a dislocation results from some sports-related activity, but this one happened in Ryan’s sleep — kind of funny in itself. Fortunately for us, the security guard at Hamot shared that the same thing happened to him.

You can bond with a lot of people in the ER in the middle of the night. I’m hoping I get a break from that though. I hesitate to use that word break, you know what I mean?

 

Posted in: Uncategorized

Switch to our mobile site