Her Times
By Pam Parker Erie Times-News staff blogger
Pam Parker's blog takes on everything from women's fun to momisms to lifestyles around Lake Erie and real estate. She'll take you down Memory Lane, up through sports and fun and off the grid. Get ready for laughs — it's more than just Pam. It's Pamdemonium.   Read more about this blog.
 Phone: 814-870-1821
Posts tagged ‘Wimbledon’
Posted: July 1st, 2013

KimikoWhen 42 year-old Kimiko Date-Krumm hit the court at Wimbledon, by most media accounts, she didn’t give 31-year-old Serena Williams much of a match, but she made her mark. Date-Krumm raced around the court like a youngster, won the hearts of people watching and stole Serena’s serve from her once. Date-Krumm lost 6-2, 6-0, but Serena beat people half that age by the same score.

And this 42-year-old earned her way onto that court. Earned it by beating a lot of young players to get there.

Age is just a number at Wimbledon — well anywhere. According to an Associated Press article, nine of the 32 players remaining for the second week of Wimbledon are 30+

Consider this from KansasCity.com:

“As of this week, the average age of the top 20 players on the men’s tour is 27 years, 260 days – more than 2 1/2 years older than it was 10 years ago, according to STATS Inc. And on the women’s tour over the last 10 years, the average age has spiked by almost exactly two years – to 26 years, 213 days.

Players such as 31-year-old Li Na, 31-year-old Mikhail Youzhny, 31-year-old David Ferrer and 35-year-old Tommy Haas – all of them preparing for Monday matches at Wimbledon – contribute to those numbers.”

Williams is the oldest woman to reach No. 1, at age 31, the article notes. And she shows no signs of slowing down.

But the youngsters are also doing well. Britain’s 19-year-old Laura Robson made a huge comeback in her last match to give her country a man and woman in the round of 16 for the first time in decades.

And American 20-year-old Sloane Stephens is hanging tough. She is picked by some commentators to hit the final — what could be an all-American final if Stephens faces Williams. And Stephens beat Williams in their last encounter at the Australian Open in January.

More than a decade ago, it was a young Serena Williams hoisting that trophy. Who would have guessed that she’d be better than ever at 31 and who knows — she might still be racing around the grass at 42.

Pam Parker, a tennis player for 40 years, is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three and stepmom to three.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: June 29th, 2013

serenaAmerican men may be gone from Wimbledon (sadly earlier than in 101 years), but the American women are doing just fine, thank-you. Here’s who’s left:

Serena Williams — I don’t think anyone can beat her, and kudos to her. At 31, she’s playing better than ever. And speaking of age, Serena’s next opponent is Kimiko Date-Krumm, 42, the oldest woman to ever advance to the third round at  Wimbledon. 

Williams got a kick out of the suggestion that she should play Britain’s Andy Murray in an exhibition match. Might be a fun match. Read about it here. Some say it could be reminiscent of the old Bobby Riggs vs. Billie Jean King match — King won for anyone who doesn’t know.

Sloane Stephens, 20, notably beat Jamie Hampton, 23, — another American — on Wednesday.

Alison Riske, 22, has also battled her way into the third round.

Madison Keys, 18, is also still in the hunt.

These four American women are still standing at Wimbledon. They will be in action today starting at 9 a.m. on ESPN. Serena Williams has five Wimbledon singles titles and five doubles’ titles.

Pam Parker, a tennis player for 40 years, is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three and stepmom to three.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: January 20th, 2013

b_sharapova_07_08It’s early morning tennis time!

You don’t have to be a tennis fan to appreciate the talents of Maria SharapovaNovak Djokovic and more at the 2013 Australian Open. I won’t spoil anything for anyone, but some great matches take place overnight.

Serbian Djokovic is playing this morning in a real nail-biter. Last year, he played in the final match that took 5 hours and 53 minutes — the longest final in history, but not the longest match by any means.

If you’re a tennis fan, early morning TV is live with the Aussie Open, or check out all the coverage at AustralianOpen.com.

Sharapova has had some great years and some real disappointments after shoulder surgery several years ago. She has been “steamrolling,” the Aussie websites say, this year. Good for her. Serena Williams is playing well also, but sister Venus is out of singles play.  But as a doubles team, the Williams sisters are still contenders.

Matches like these are something to see. For those of us who have played tennis every week for decades, or even if you just take the game up tomorrow — it’s great exercise, great fun and exciting to watch — especially live in the early mornings. G’day!

Pam Parker is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyle, Her Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa. She is the mom of three, stepmom to three and step-grandmom to one.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: September 3rd, 2012

Check out Mike Copper’s article on Erie tennis phenom Mary Dailey, right here.

Dailey, 50, played tennis for Mercyhurst Prep in the 1970s.

She was honored today at the U.S. Open for winning national double’s tournaments on a variety of surfaces in 2011. She received the Grand Slam of Women’s Professional Tennis award for USTA doubles titles on clay, grass, indoor and outdoor hard courts. Congrats to Mary!

Pam Parker has been a tennis player for more than 35 years.  She is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa.

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: September 2nd, 2012

It’s an odd year when nearly 31-year-old Serena Williams starts interviews with “I’m not retiring.” But who can blame her when 29-year-old Kim Clijsters announced last week that she would retire from singles after the U.S. Open.

Not 24 hours later, 30-year-old Andy Roddick added that it was his swan song as well. He plays today — read the US Open discussion of his chances here.

Serena is having one of her best years ever, and I would be surprised to see anyone beat her. She has come back from some major health problems, and had a disastrous French Open — losing in the opening round. She came back to win her fifth Wimbledon in record fashion with 24 services aces in one match and a record 102 in the tournament at the 2012 Wimbledon Championships. She also won the gold medal in the Olympics’ singles tournament and gold in the doubles with her sister Venus.

What’s to become of American tennis after Roddick leaves the game?  John Isner, 27, is moving up the ranks along with Jack Sock, 20.

On the women’s side, Sloane Stepens, 19, is making some waves as a younger American to be reckoned with. Her late father was a pro football player and her mom is a former All American swimmer.

Pam Parker has been a tennis player for more than 30 years. She is the editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa.

 

 

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: July 5th, 2012

In a letter to the editor yesterday in the Erie Times-News, a 72-year-old man wrote a great letter. James Ligons of Erie wrote that high school athletes should learn to play tennis because of the hand and eye coordination, footwork and endurance.

As a tennis player, I endorse that!  He added another note about men playing tennis in their 80s and 90s. Very true — I play with them, and they can kick your butt any day of the week!

There was a time when I was going to give up tennis because of my bad runner’s knees. Then I played with these guys. And gals. You’ll never quit if you see these folks in action.

If you want to take up the game, visit Westwood Racquet Club or Pennbriar Athletic Club.  They can hook you and your kids up with a lesson just to see if you like it. My kids have played since they were little. They never played competitively like I did, but they all acknowledge that it improves balance in nearly every sport.

And this week, you can tune into Wimbledon where you’ll see some professional tennis action.  And for anyone who says it’s too expensive — I spent more money bowling than I ever did at tennis. Read Ligons’ letter here.

Pam Parker is the mom of three, stepmom of three and editor of Lake Erie LifeStyleHer Times and House to Home at the Erie Times-News in Erie, Pa.

 

 

Posted in: Uncategorized
Posted: January 29th, 2012

You don’t have to be a tennis fan to appreciate the talents of Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal. At the 2012 Australian Open, Serbian Djokovic was the winner with scores of 5-7, 6-4, 6-2, 6-7(5), 7-5. It was a nail-biter of a record-setting match that took 5 hours and 53 minutes. If you don’t understand those scores, it’s OK — let’s just say it was really close. And long. It was the longest final in history, but not the longest match by any means.

I can’t say I watched every minute, but I watched the last half, and it was an incredible competition. Just imagine, pouring everything you’ve got onto the court for nearly six hours. No subbing in. No lunch and dinner breaks. No half time. You just keep playing, running, jumping and focusing on what you can do to close out a marathon match and win it.

In the end, Djokovic won. But don’t dare call Nadal a loser. As the commentators noted, it came down to a couple of points and lucky bounces. It was tough to watch anyone lose. And after that match, the awards ceremony seemed almost painful as some of the sponsors gave rather lengthy speeches. Poor Djokovic and Nadal were cramping and looked very uncomfortable waiting to accept their awards. Thankfully, the tournament folks saw their discomfort and delivered chairs and water bottles.

It was all good for the game and garnered tremendous interest much like the famous Isner- Mahut match at Wimbledon in 2010. American John Isner defeated Nicolas Mahut in 11 hours, 5 minutes over three days, and it took 183 games. That match, not a final, was the longest ever, but there have been many matches among men and women that stretched past six hours. Wikipedia has them right here.

Matches like these are something to see. For those of us who have played tennis every week for decades, interesting finals bring excitement to the court — a place I love to play, but not in six-hour stretches.

Posted in: Uncategorized

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