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Friday question: chafing prevention & remedies

By | June 20, 2014 7:48 am | 0 Comments

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The summer heat & humidity = painful showers and chafing scars for many runners. I asked: How do you deal with chafing? Share any prevention tips and/or remedies!

Body glide, no issues. But, if you already have chafing, aquaphor or diaper cream works well.  — Pat Krott

I also use body glide. It’s the best! No issues when using that! — Jessie Zahner

Body Glide ….  and compression shorts ….. that’s all you need. — Ramon Patron Jr.

Calluses. Develop calluses and chafing is no longer a problem. — Jim Lang

Aquafor…..helps prevent chafing, and works magic on fixing things if you missed an are. — Christine Vassen

Glide, glide, glide. And don’t wear cotton clothes. — Leslie Cooksey

Chamois Butt’r or Body Glide.  Chamois Butt’r is the “balm.”  ;D — Mike Lawrence

I use baby powder. I have not chafed since I started using before races and long runs.  — Jameel Gavin

Copious amounts of baby powder in the boxer briefs!! For a cooling effect the medicated Goldbond is awesome. Speaking of briefs, I love Under Armour Heat Gear boxer briefs — goood support, moisture wicking, and durable. One of the pairs I have have been through 4 tough mudders, 2 muddy vikings, a beast on the bay, and a bunch of runs. I have a bunch of other brands too, but UA nailed it with their style. Also…band aids on the nips — depending on how much running (and sweating) I do, my shirts (and kind) chafe my nipples. In winter, I use a compression base gear, but in summer,  just use a with old Band-Aids. — Matt Kleck

Aquaphor rules, hands down, even in rain. Lube up! — Sean Donachy

Old school: Vaseline for the arms/sides, Band-aids for the nipples for my marathon on Saturday. (For clarity, as a guy, I don’t wear a sports bra). And I have bloodied singlets on long runs without Band-aids (not to mention the discomfort that gave me a new appreciation for the difficulties that half of the human race deals with). — Michael Morris

More advice from the gurus at Runner’s World.

Things I found — 2/27/14

By | February 27, 2014 1:44 am | 0 Comments

Worth Reading

* You don’t need a gym membership or weights so strength train. Use your own body weight.  Check out these exercises that will  challenge your whole body (and there are links to more, too).

* The Art of Running Shoe Maintenance has some interesting tips (some I’ve never heard before) to keep your running shoes in top form.

* Beware of signing up for any races directed by The Shadiest Man in the Racing Business.  (Can you imagine signing up for a marathon, doing all the training, booking the hotel, and then find on race morning that there is no race???)

* Runners are often Type-A people who don’t love to sleep because..you know, it’s just not that productive and they’d much rather be doing 10,000 other things and maybe go for another run, but making time for serious Zs is just as important as your weekly long run (maybe more). Need more convincing? Here are 25 things that happen if you don’t get enough sleep. (and having made an effort to increase my own sleep time, I can tell you it makes a world of difference).

* A friend and I were just talking about the latest FitBit craze and we both agree, we won’t be getting one…pretty much for the reason this woman dumped her Nike Fuel Band.

 

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Dead legs (answers)

By | February 11, 2014 1:06 am | 0 Comments

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I recently received this question from a reader:

I just started a jogging program, fast walk for 1.5 minutes and then run/jog for 1 min. It is a total 30 minute workout. My legs feel like dead weights from the knees down. I run every other day. What is causing this and how do I correct it?

I’ve had this problem from time to time and it’s usually the result of overtraining or nutrition (or likely a combination of both), but I reached out to the Erie area running community to see if they had any other ides for our reader.

Here’s what they had to say:

Her questions raise a lot more questions. How long has this person been walking/running? What is their body type, age and what kind of shoes are they wearing? Need the right shoe to for sure. Maybe start there. — Ginny Sackett

Editor’s note: Good point on the shoes! If you’re not wearing proper running shoes, get thee to Achille’s Running Shop in Erie to get professionally fitted.

When is she running? Maybe she should have a banana before she starts. Has she just started? We all know you have to work up to any distance, even a couple city blocks. — Linda Huegel

Honestly, I used to have that problem big time and found out I was anemic. Maybe ask her to get her iron checked. It literally got so bad in high school that I went from running the mile in like 6 minutes to struggling to run 10 minute miles. I had no idea what was wrong but they told me because I went to have surgery but my iron was low. She should def go get checked out. — Jessie Zahner

The beauty of time intervals is we don’t have to go a set distance, but for a beginner sometimes people think 1 minute on means all out. Maybe they could go a little easier in the jogging. — Greg Cooper

I agree with Greg Cooper. He or she may be doing too much too fast. She may want to decrease her training depending on the extent and duration of pain. Ice her legs to reduce any inflammation. She also may want to try an exercise of standing on the edge of curb or slightly elevated place and while holding on to something sturdy, gently lift herself up on her toes and come down far enough where her toes are pointing up (not too far) and do several repetitions a day and gradually increase her training. Leg wraps and compression sleeves may help as well. — Dave Lesher

Things I found While Looking Around — 1/16/14

By | January 16, 2014 1:56 am | 0 Comments

Worth Reading

* 7 Habits of Highly Effective Runners and Eaters

* Don’t be fooled by the claims on the front of the package. Check the nutrition facts. Here are 16 supposedly healthy foods with more sugar than a Snickers bar

* Tight shoulders are common among runners, particularly among runners who have desk jobs. Here are some tips to help you loosen up.

* Completely unrelated to running, but Outside online wrote a fascinating piece on Iditerod racer Lance Mackey: The world’s toughest athlete.

* Again, not running related, but…cycling is good cross-training and I stumbled upon this offer for a free e-book from Vello Mom — Road Biking for Beginners. You have to join their mailing list to get a link to the book (a 22-page PDF). I haven’t read it all the way through, yet, but it looks worth reading.

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Video of the Week

T-shirt of the Week

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Available here for $12.

 

 

Time to detox (You can do anything for six weeks)

By | December 31, 2013 1:43 am | Comments Off

One of the most surprising things I learned when I experimented with a paleo-like diet a year ago was how my cravings for carbohydrates and sweets completely went away after abstaining for them for a few weeks.  I could sit in front of a plate of cookies or a basket of bread and have zero desire to eat them. I just didn’t want them anymore.

I was amazed at how long I stayed full when I ate meat and veggies (yep, with oil and butter).  And… I didn’t have any trouble keeping weight off even when I reduced my mileage substantially.

I felt like I won the lottery. I could eat steak and broccoli with butter (and stay satiated for hours…no need or craving to snack), run half the miles I used to, and fit into the smallest size I’d worn since my 20s.

Then I got talked into a marathon (still not sure how that happened). The increased mileage (and the resulting cramps and fatigue) forced me to add some recovery carbs back into my diet. It started with “good carbs” like sweet potatoes, but soon veered off into the land of sweets, crackers, chocolate and diet soda again.

*sigh*

Sugar is a slippery slope, my friends.  It’s insidious — it’s in nearly everything we eat. If not the real thing, then some form of it — honey, high fructose corn syrup, brown sugar, aspartame, sucrose, etc.  (By the way, your body metabolizes bread/pasta and alcohol much like sugar).

So here I am at the end of the holiday season, having scarfed down more than my share of Christmas cookies, candies and hot drinks full of delish (but sugar-filled) creamers, and I feel like hell.  I’ve gained 12 lbs. since my pre-marathon-training “eating clean” days and my runs suck. Whether that’s due to the extra weight or the “poison” I keep putting in my body, I don’t know. But, I know it’s over now.

Time to detox.

And you can join me — us, actually — a bunch of the Team Adrenaline gang are jumping on Doc’s Detox wagon and committing to give up sugar (in all forms), alcohol and caffeine for 6 weeks in an effort to “reset” our systems.

Yeah…caffeine. I’m giving up my beloved 6+ cups a day. Consider yourself warned, my friends. It won’t be pretty.

“Doc” is chiropractor Steve Krauza, owner of Krauza Family Chiropractic and founder/leader of Team Adrenaline.
He’s adamant that detoxes are not diets:

“Detoxes are not designed to be sustained over long periods of time. This particular detox is designed to eliminate cravings, increase energy, increase focus, and create an awareness of how your body reacts to certain chemicals.

This detox will not require you to purchase any pills, drinks, or gadgets. It doesn’t require you to deprive yourself of food or cause you to starve. This detox will cleanse your system from the holiday excesses. It will help your nervous system, digestive system, and immune system hit the Ctrl-Alt-Delete button as you start the new year.

Detoxes are not diets (see the recurring theme, here?). As a result, detoxes are not something you “dabble” in. Detoxes are all or nothing. Why? If you are trying to rid your body of certain chemicals, it means it has to be out of your system 100% to get the full desired effect. The degree of challenge is determined by your degree of dependency on the particular chemical you are detoxing.

The New Year Detox is not about weight loss. It’s about cleansing your body of the holiday excesses, eliminating chemical dependency, and improving the function of your nervous system. You will lose weight, but that’s not the purpose of this detox.

The New Year Detox starts January 1, 2014 and ends February 12, 2014.

You in?

You’ll be amazed at how wonderful you’ll feel come mid-February…and maybe you will have broken a few bad habits that you never need to pick up again (unless you get talked into a marathon or something).

Watch the video below for inspiration & all the details. Email Doc (or me) for a PDF handout with a list of which foods to avoid & tips for success.

youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPGyFLxW8Aw&w=560&h=315]

Things I found while looking around — 12/12/13

By | December 12, 2013 2:31 am | 0 Comments

Worth reading

* Life advice from ultra happy ultrarunner Hal Koerner

* What’s for dinner? Need inspired?  11 athletes share their favorite meals.

* Car versus deer versus runner. (This is the kind of crap that would happen to me.)

* Did you know funny guy Will Ferrell is an avid runner & marathoner? Yep, Buddy Elf goes long.

 

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Video of the Week

Next time you have to run on a treadmill, may you do so with the enthusiasm of Meatball, the Corgi on the playground carousel:

T-shirt of the Week

This is a DIY Santa shirt…perfect for Saturday morning’s ERC Snowflake 5K!

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Instructions here.

 

 

Know the lingo: Tangent

By | December 4, 2013 1:09 am | 0 Comments

When you’re just getting started in a sport, it’s hard to learn all the lingo. Running and walking, like any sport, has it’s own special language and local phrases. Each week, I’ll define a term or phrase that will help you not only walk the walk (or run the run), but talk the talk.

Have you ever heard the phrase “run the tangent” and wondered what it meant? Mark Remy explains it best in his funny-but-true book, The Runner’s Rule Book (a great stocking stuffer, by the way):

Race courses are measured on the tangents—that is assuming the shortest line around corners and bends. This means that the best, fastest possible way for you to take a turn involves “running” or “cutting” the tangent: You start near the center of the road, then aim to hit the corner right on the corner before swinging back out.  (If you ever want to see this done beautifully and at incredible speeds watch the criterium bike race in downtown Erie.)

What this does not mean is that you should hop the curb, run on the sidewalk, or otherwise leave the course itself to shave a few seconds off your time, or avoid the rest of us suckers who are following the rules. In a race, hopping curbs is cheating and, it does matter.

 

Things I found — 11/7/13

By | November 7, 2013 1:33 am | 0 Comments

 Worth reading

* When doing hill repeats, do you walk or run back down? Greg Cooper, running coach at Penn State Behrend (you know, the teams that just swept the AMCC cross country titles),says it may better to walk down in his blog post Hills, Workouts, and Walking?

* Speaking of sweeping events… Erie dynamo running duo Jenny Turak & Joe Hunt took first place overall in last weekend’s Mud On The Mountain adventure race in Seven Springs. The race is 7.73 miles long and has 25 obstacles. Congrats to Joe & Jenny..thanks for making Erie look tough!

* Great gourds: How pumpkins can help your running.

* Race T-shirt etiquette (funny, but…uh…mostly true, too)

* NYC’s oldest female marathon finisher dies :(

*After the marathon, beer! Mark Remy talks to NYC marathoners, post race…at the bar. Awesome.

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T-shirt of the week

Here’s one for you fellow children of the ’80s

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Available here for $27.

 

 

Running tips for shorter days

By | November 5, 2013 1:21 am | 0 Comments

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Now that we’ve turned the clocks back, it’s likely most of us will be running or walking in the dark (or low-light conditions…which is almost worse)

Runners should always run defensively, but it’s even more important in the dark. Here are a few safety tips you should heed:

* Always run against traffic. Never run with traffic or you won’t be able to see potential danger and/or get out of the driver’s way. Don’t even think about getting into a battle over space with a 2,000 lb. vehicle — you won’t win — just get the hell out of the way.

* Never cross an intersection without making eye contact with the driver(s) waiting. I know of three friends who have been hit (on separate occasions) when they stepped into a crosswalk (they had the walk signal) and a car that was turning right on red failed to look right before they turned and nailed them. (In all cases the friends were OK, but…had weeks or months of healing).

* Be visible. Wear light colored clothing and put on lots of reflective gear. There’s no such thing as too much reflective gear (particularly if you run early in the AM when bleary-eyed drivers aren’t expecting to see someone running down the road). There are a reflective running clothesthat don’t look “dorky.” I own a couple Illuminite jackets, and two different kinds of vests (a mesh one for warm weather, a thicker one for cooler weather).

* Carry a small flashlight. Get yourself one of those little 6-inch Mag-lights or use your daughter’s Disney Princess flashlight…doesn’t matter what it looks like — it just needs to fit comfortably in your hand (flashlights with a wrist strap are great). Flashlights are useful to alert drivers to your presence (for instance, we turn ours on when running on a busy road or a road with a blind curve) and are also useful for determining whether that dark spot in the road is a shadow you can run through or a splattered raccoon you’ll want to run around.

* Carry I.D.  No need to stuff your license in your undies…just get yourself an ID (you could even make one at the pet store…who said pet tags are only for pets). Not into dog tags? Check out www.roadid.com. where you can buy ID tags that strap to your ankle or wrist or thread onto your shoelaces.

* Vary your route. Runners are creatures of habit, but it’s smart to vary your route and days you run. I realize you may not be able to vary the time, but…don’t let your morning routine become predictable. Potential attackers can easily find a place to hide in the shadows.

* Leave the music at home. I love to run with music, but once it gets dark, I often run without it. I’m just not comfortable having two of my five senses handicapped. If I can’t see, I need to be able to hear potential danger.

* Carry a cell phone. I don’t carry my phone when I run in the summer — shorts and tank tops just don’t offer much space to stash a phone, but once winter comes, the weather turns colder and the mornings are dark, I often carry it in my jacket pocket.

* Run with a buddy. No doubt there is safety in numbers. Not only are you less likely to be victimized if you’re running with someone else, but…if you should fall in a pothole or off a curb (cause it’s dark and you can’t see) — there’s a friend to help you hobble off the road and, then, run for help.

* Follow your instincts. Ladies — you have sixth sense and you know it. When something is not right…you feel it all over. Go with that. If you’re feeling creeped out some morning (or evening) — trust your gut and run on the treadmill.

Vintage post: It’s all in the timing

By | October 31, 2013 1:42 am | 0 Comments

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If you’re new to the local racing scene you may be wondering what “tag” or “bib” timing is versus “chip” timing. Throw in “gun” time and you’re probably really confused, right?

Let me try and explain it to you in the next few posts — particularly how (and when) it’s used by the Erie Runners Club.

Today, we’ll talk traditional bib timing:

What it is: Bib (also called Tag) Timing is when they use your bib (race) number to compile results.

When it’s used: The ERC uses this for most of the smaller races because it’s cheap and fairly easy when doing a race with less than, say, 300 people (though the timing folks might not agree on the easy part).

How it works:When you finish the race, volunteers will rip the bottom half of your tag off and stringing it onto a coat hanger (called a “stringer”). Then, the timing people input those numbers into the computer IN ORDER OF FINISH and the computer does the rest (i.e. matches the number to the person…ranks you in your age group, etc.).

Stay in order: In Bib timing, it’s very important that you stay in order when you cross the finish line and are in the finisher’s chute (and volunteers will likely remind you by saying, “stay in order!”). You should never pass anyone in the finishers chute, because if you do, the results will show you finishing ahead of them…when, actually, you finished behind them.

Word to the wise: When running a bib timed race (and you’ll know it’s a bib timed race if they don’t tell you to go get a chip), you should check your bib when you pin it on. Look to be sure it has:
1.) Your name on it.
2.) Your correct age
3.) The right gender — M or F
4.) The right division — 10K, 5K, run, walk, etc.

They don’t actually type this info. in when you finish, but…. the info on the label on your bib is the information that the computer has for you, so if it’s wrong…your results will be to.

If you see a problem: Go to the registration table as soon as your realize there’s a problem and tell a volunteer. They’ll get the correct information to the timing folks. Don’t wait until the results are done — report any issues as soon as your notice them.

What about the number? As I explained above, volunteers will take the bottom portion of your number at the finish line. The rest of the bib is yours to keep. Most runners hang onto their numbers for posterity. I always write the race name, date, distance and my finish time on the back.

Originally posted: March 26th, 2008