Posts in the category

Things I found — 11/27/14

By | November 27, 2014 2:03 am | 0 Comments

Worth Reading

8 weight loss mistakes runners make.

Your “feel good” story of the week: 91 year old marathoner is a true inspiration.

How cold is too cold to run? Some solid advice here.

For the ladies (or long-haired guys): Easy mid-length hairstyles (though…none…none…will beat my friend Heather D.’s indestructible ‘do. Her hair looks exactly the same at the start and finish of every marathon/race).

Also for the ladies (or maybe some guys…not judging :-)) — turns out some runners really should wear heels. Maybe this is why my one & only battle with the dreaded plantar fasciitis ended so quickly — I almost always wear a low heel.

At the movies: Memorable Running Scenes

Tshirt of the Week

Um…hello….it’s a Turkey Trot shirt with a “Hungry Games” theme and 12 colors representing the 12 districts (and tie-dye for the Capitol , i.e. volunteers & race officials). That’s just cool. Props to Dave Comi, ERC president, for the concept and Creative Imprint Systems, for the the artwork & silkscreening.

tureky trot shirt

Friday question: chafing prevention & remedies

By | June 20, 2014 7:48 am | 0 Comments

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The summer heat & humidity = painful showers and chafing scars for many runners. I asked: How do you deal with chafing? Share any prevention tips and/or remedies!

Body glide, no issues. But, if you already have chafing, aquaphor or diaper cream works well.  — Pat Krott

I also use body glide. It’s the best! No issues when using that! — Jessie Zahner

Body Glide ….  and compression shorts ….. that’s all you need. — Ramon Patron Jr.

Calluses. Develop calluses and chafing is no longer a problem. — Jim Lang

Aquafor…..helps prevent chafing, and works magic on fixing things if you missed an are. — Christine Vassen

Glide, glide, glide. And don’t wear cotton clothes. — Leslie Cooksey

Chamois Butt’r or Body Glide.  Chamois Butt’r is the “balm.”  ;D — Mike Lawrence

I use baby powder. I have not chafed since I started using before races and long runs.  — Jameel Gavin

Copious amounts of baby powder in the boxer briefs!! For a cooling effect the medicated Goldbond is awesome. Speaking of briefs, I love Under Armour Heat Gear boxer briefs — goood support, moisture wicking, and durable. One of the pairs I have have been through 4 tough mudders, 2 muddy vikings, a beast on the bay, and a bunch of runs. I have a bunch of other brands too, but UA nailed it with their style. Also…band aids on the nips — depending on how much running (and sweating) I do, my shirts (and kind) chafe my nipples. In winter, I use a compression base gear, but in summer,  just use a with old Band-Aids. — Matt Kleck

Aquaphor rules, hands down, even in rain. Lube up! — Sean Donachy

Old school: Vaseline for the arms/sides, Band-aids for the nipples for my marathon on Saturday. (For clarity, as a guy, I don’t wear a sports bra). And I have bloodied singlets on long runs without Band-aids (not to mention the discomfort that gave me a new appreciation for the difficulties that half of the human race deals with). — Michael Morris

More advice from the gurus at Runner’s World.

Common knee pain causes

By | March 14, 2014 1:25 am | 0 Comments

Recently saw this posted on FB and found it quite interesting.
for RN blog

Dead legs (answers)

By | February 11, 2014 1:06 am | 0 Comments

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I recently received this question from a reader:

I just started a jogging program, fast walk for 1.5 minutes and then run/jog for 1 min. It is a total 30 minute workout. My legs feel like dead weights from the knees down. I run every other day. What is causing this and how do I correct it?

I’ve had this problem from time to time and it’s usually the result of overtraining or nutrition (or likely a combination of both), but I reached out to the Erie area running community to see if they had any other ides for our reader.

Here’s what they had to say:

Her questions raise a lot more questions. How long has this person been walking/running? What is their body type, age and what kind of shoes are they wearing? Need the right shoe to for sure. Maybe start there. — Ginny Sackett

Editor’s note: Good point on the shoes! If you’re not wearing proper running shoes, get thee to Achille’s Running Shop in Erie to get professionally fitted.

When is she running? Maybe she should have a banana before she starts. Has she just started? We all know you have to work up to any distance, even a couple city blocks. — Linda Huegel

Honestly, I used to have that problem big time and found out I was anemic. Maybe ask her to get her iron checked. It literally got so bad in high school that I went from running the mile in like 6 minutes to struggling to run 10 minute miles. I had no idea what was wrong but they told me because I went to have surgery but my iron was low. She should def go get checked out. — Jessie Zahner

The beauty of time intervals is we don’t have to go a set distance, but for a beginner sometimes people think 1 minute on means all out. Maybe they could go a little easier in the jogging. — Greg Cooper

I agree with Greg Cooper. He or she may be doing too much too fast. She may want to decrease her training depending on the extent and duration of pain. Ice her legs to reduce any inflammation. She also may want to try an exercise of standing on the edge of curb or slightly elevated place and while holding on to something sturdy, gently lift herself up on her toes and come down far enough where her toes are pointing up (not too far) and do several repetitions a day and gradually increase her training. Leg wraps and compression sleeves may help as well. — Dave Lesher

Things I found — 8/8/13

By | August 8, 2013 1:19 am | 0 Comments

Worth Reading

* Protein is key to satiating meals and, therefore, key to weight loss (you eat much less when you eat protein). Here are 9 Portable Protein Sources for Athletes (though I disagree with peanut butter…it’s full of sugar and peanuts are legumes, not nuts).

* Can’t figure out what your next race should be? Take the pop quiz to find out what your next challenge should be.

* Dogs don’t sweat, so be cautious about taking your favorite four-legged partner on a run on a hot, humid day (no matter how much they WANT to go). Heed these 12 safety tips for running with your dog in the heat.

funny

Gear of the week (I’m getting bored with T-shirts)

Check out these cool MantraBands!  Mantras can get you through a tough race. I’ve got several mantras and they’ve changed over the years. The one I relied on in the PA Grand Canyon marathon was “Relentless Forward Progression.” I don’t see that one here, but I’m thinking I won’t need that one again anyway.  “Carpe Diem” or “Enjoy the Journey” might be better choices for me now.

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Wanna be a Poser?

Also…don’t forget about Pose-method classes that are now available in Erie. Here are the details:

crossfit

 

 

 

Friday ?: Recovery Aids

By | July 12, 2013 3:02 am | 0 Comments

What’s your number one recovery aid (aids)? ice bath, compression socks, chocolate milk? What’s your go-to to speed recovery?

“Vicodin.” — Dbrew (It’s a joke, people!)

“IPA” — Ross Aresco (It’s a type of beer)

“Easy runs” — Pat Krott

“Diet Dr. Pepper and potato chips!” — Jan Comi

“Lavender Epsom salts in my bath while drinking a beer!” — Karen Groshek

“Chocolate Milk, Compression Socks, Ice Bath…in that order of importance. I see too many runners wait too long for the chocolate milk (or other carb/protein replenishment if they are vegan). The Compression Socks don’t have to come before ice, but they do make a difference. We have had athletes do significant workloads and slide into a pair of compression socks between along with a nice snack and be able to handle everything on a very hard day and not be any more sore than a normal hard run. Ice never hurts (except frostbite) so I do think that it’s critical, and the constriction of the capillaries is really important to reduce the chance of inflammation, and also a good recovery tool if you forgot anything else and are sore the next day.” — Greg Cooper (Editor’s note: Greg is Penn State Behrend’s head running coach…which is to say…a guy who would know about recovery! :0 )

And more from the coach:

“Also, Patrick Krott’s suggestion of easy run is also great. Of particular benefit is running a recovery run at a recovery pace within 24 hours of a hard run. Inside our brain, interleukin-6 is the trigger that causes us to feel we have fatigue, this is also an inhibitor of motor impulses from brain to muscle (this is bad if you’re trying to run fast at the end of the race) Some research from the U of Copenhagen in Denmark says that the easy run w/in 24 hours of the hard run allows your body to learn to run with lower levels of glycogen (one of your primary fuels), so when we run those easy runs, we teach our body to continue to send those motor impulses from brain to muscle when we are tired, fatigued, sore, etc., This is not eliminating soreness, but it’s teaching your body to not feel that pain/soreness nearly as much the next time. This is probably a good thing if you want to progress in your training.”

Things I found — 6/20/13

By | June 20, 2013 1:18 am | 0 Comments

Worth Reading

* Are you big on post-recovery aids, such as ice baths and ibuprofen? You may want to rethink that.

* 5 good reasons to add some speed to your  life (and…a few easy ways to do so).

* Irunfar.com: Peak Performance and the Selfish Brain. This is fascinating insight into what’s going on with your brain and body in an endurance event.  Your brain will have the last word as its job is to regulate everything to keep itself..and your body alive, but there are a few ways you can trick it to avoid having it pull the plug on your efforts at the 20th mile (or 40th mile or 60th mile).

Funny stuff

* Runner’s World’s Mark Remy has revealed the scientific reason that some runners are total jackwads don’t wave. Read all about it.

Group runs — for safety

In America, we gather in large running groups for fun, but in Venezuala, they run in large groups for safety.
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T-shirt of the Week

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Available here in various styles.

Train drain

By | June 17, 2013 8:35 am | 0 Comments

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istockphoto.com/Erie Times-News

There’s an interesting article in the Erie Times-News’ sport section today. The headline sure caught my eye this morning: Train drain: Stop running yourself into the ground, and get more by doing less.

It’s a thought-provoking read that worth your 10 minutes.

Check it out here.

 

 

Friday Question: Aid for sore muscles

By | June 14, 2013 1:39 am | 0 Comments

sore

www.fitsugar.com

This week’s question addresses something EVERY runner has dealt with — sore muscles!

I asked runners: What’s your favorite/go-to remedy for sore muscles?

* Epson salts/ foam roller and a beer. — Amy Cronk

* Between  golf balls and “the stick,” I rely on massaging to rub out and keep circulation moving. — Christine Vassen

* I like arnica gel for treating inflammation and comfrey ointment for muscle knots and pain. — Debbie DeAngelo

* Ice bath, it’s cold, but it works! After about 7 minutes you really can’t feel anything (but, yes, that first 7 minutes isn’t much fun) — Greg Cooper

* Tonic water (applied internally, not externally!). — Bill Cox

* Rest, massage, wine. — Pat Krott

* Dr. Teals Epsom salts–lavender—not the plain kind in the Pharmacy section of Wal-Mart—the lavender scented are by the nicer bath soaps down a few aisles. Foolproof (for the fools who overuse their muscles…LOL).  — Eloise Hawking

* Foam roller, stretching. Advil if necessary. — Ginny Sackett

 

I’m a poser

By | June 3, 2013 1:04 am | 1 Comment

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 Me…posing

So I took a 90-minute lesson in the Pose Method of running from Julie Robinson, owner of RunErie and a certified Pose running instructor and wrote about it for yesterday’s Her Times magazine in the Erie Times-News. Here’s my part:

Posed to Run

By Heather Cass

I love my hot pink and black Saucony Cohesion running shoes with their wide toe box and cushy heels, but Julie Robinson, an Erie-based Pose running coach, said they have to go.

“You need to lose the big shoes,” she said.

I’ve been a heel striker for all of my running life, about 15 years now. It’s obvious if you look at my running shoes. The outside edges of both heels are worn off from being scuffed into the ground for hundreds of miles.

Landing on the ground heel first when running is bad. It sends hundreds of pounds of pressure up the legs, through the hips and into the lower back. It can cause a host of running-related injuries from shin splints to Achilles tendinitis to herniated discs.

Robinson and I are in a parking lot at Penn State Behrend where she is giving me a short course in the Pose Method, which encourages the use of lightweight, thin-soled shoes.

“Getting out of the big shoes helps reduce heel striking because it hurts when you do so in a more minimalist shoe, which forces a change in and of itself,” she said. “But it’s learning to correctly ‘fall’ into Pose that gets rid of that nasty habit. Big shoes just get in the way.”

What is Pose?

It’s hard to explain, but according to www.posetech.com, the Pose is a one-legged stance with the head, shoulders and hips aligned over the ball of the foot. The airborne foot is up under the hips, and running becomes a sequence of falling forward from this position, having the airborne leg drop to keep from falling to the ground and using the hamstring to pull the trailing foot into the airborne position, then returning to the Pose on the opposite leg.

Got it? No? That’s OK because Robinson does get it. In the 90 minutes Robinson and I spent together, she was able to demonstrate some of the methods she uses to build a better runner. It’s a gradual process. She doesn’t just take your shoes away and force you to run in a whole new way. You have to build strength and mobility in your ankles and hips first. You have to work your way down to a lesser-cushioned shoe. You have to practice the one-legged stance, master the use of gravity and “falling forward” and learn to pull your leg up, using your hamstring, instead of pushing off the ground with your toes.

“With Pose, you don’t need the ground to get moving,” Robinson said. “You’re pulling your leg up, not pushing off. Pose is perfect for trail runners who run on rocky, uneven terrain.”

Three days after meeting with Robinson, I ran the Cleveland half marathon. I concentrated on applying some of the principles she taught me, constantly reminding myself to pull, stay centered and fall forward. While I didn’t set any personal records that day (it was 80 degrees), I had no soreness, calf cramps or knee twinges during or after the race. That is a victory for this veteran runner.

Veteran Verdict: Even veterans with closets full of medals and awards can benefit from learning the Pose Method and working with Robinson and Run Erie to improve their form.

There’s more to the story — you can read what newbie runner Marnie Mead Oberle thought of the method here and see a video here.

Bottom line is this: Julie knows her stuff. If you’ve been plagued by constant injuries, it’s worth checking out.  Heck, even if you’ve not been plagued with injuries and you’ve been running (and placing) for 15 years, it’s worth checking out.

You can find more info here and learn about some great workshops they are offering with a master pose coach here.

Starting in June, Run Erie will offer a full schedule of classes on Pose basics at the introductory rate of eight classes for $75. Private lessons are also available at individual and package rates.

RunErie will also bring in master Pose coach Valerie Hunt from Austin, Texas, who will teach two eight-hour seminars with personalized video analysis on June 29 and 30 at CrossFit FBO, 1311 Chestnut St. Cost:$150.

The clinics are open to all ages and ability levels. Each clinic includes eight hours of instruction, video analysis, and time for lunch and socialization with new friends. Details for registration are available on Run Erie’s Facebook page under the events tab or e-mail Run Erie at info@runerie.com.

If nothing else, follow Run Erie on Facebook and learn more about the pose method — they frequently post videos and tips.